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A Brief History

In 1906, Everett Davis became the station agent for Lake Station
on the B&M Railroad in Newbury, NH. His mother, Mindwell Bugby Davis,
bought a parcel of land and built a house for them to live in with
additional rooms to rent. During the great depression Everett and
Florence had four children, one of whom was about to attend college.
In 1932 the Cabins became the solution to their financial hardship.
The first cabin Everett built was 12 (formally, Cabin A) that came from
a Sears kit. The business grew and in 1941 they officially incorporated.
As Mindwell continued to purchase surrounding land put up for sale by the
railroad, Everett continued to build cabins into the 50's until he had the
sixteen that we continue to rent today. When Everett and Florence were
gone in 1967 their daughter Muriel continued the business for the next
thirty years. Muriel's daughter Joan, her husband Art and their two
daughters, Emily and Julia are carrying the business on now.





Fun Facts:

Cabins 5, 9, 12, and 10 used to be double cabins and each room would be
rented to a different family, which is why there are two doors leading into the
bathrooms.

The land from the boathouse to the point was purchased in 1942 for $3000.

Granite slabs that were part of the turntable of Lake Station still stand by the
swingset.

Some of the doors in the big house and the WC were acquired from the original
MV Kearsarge, after Everett bought it after it was retired and scraped it for parts.

The cabins were originally built without bathrooms or kitchens attached and the
renters shared an outhouse behind the office. Showers were also a late addition,
as the bathrooms did not originally include them.

The cribs of the steamboat docks still lie underwater just off the shores at either
end of our property.

The rec room used to be a fully functioning restaurant; old menus are currently
framed on the walls.